7 Excuses You Must Avoid to Be an Effective Leader

I ran out of time word dice

The culture of accepting excuses as reality is here. In previous generations, people were held accountable for making excuses for their behavior or decisions. Today’s workplace is different. Not only are we ok with rationalization, we almost encourage it.  

To give you an idea of how popular making excuses has become, a recent study found the average American will make 2,190 excuses yearly (six reasons daily) to validate their decisions.

Before you go making an excuse for the research, we’ve all been there. Something doesn’t work out, or we are disappointed because reality didn’t meet our expectations. When things don’t go our way, it’s easy to look for something or someone else to blame. This is precisely what an excuse is; an attempt to lessen the blame; seek to defend or justify.

The best leaders recognize an excuse for what it is and refuse to make or accept them from others.  

Great leaders don’t make excuses because it gets them further away from positive progress. 

Turning Excuses into Power

Allowing excuses to become a regular part of your everyday routine is a recipe for mediocrity and will put you in a powerless position. What if, instead of justifying things, you embraced responsibility and became powerful? How much better would you and your team perform if each person took ownership each day?

Take my health journey as an example. I have a weight goal that I am working towards this year. My accountability partner texted me yesterday, “Get your work in today?” My first response was an excuse, “Rear deltoid injury.” Without missing a beat, his response exposed my excuse, “But your legs still work, no?”

No alt text provided for this image

When it comes to leadership, many Managers and Executives have mastered the art of making excuses; placing responsibility onto someone else. With this in mind, here are the most common excuses I hear and ways to turn them into statements that will help you and your team be successful. 

Excuse 1: “I am waiting on someone else.”

Without a doubt, this is the most popular excuse in corporate America. “I am waiting on someone else to do something, so I can do something.” While there is no denying the corporate decision-making structure and hierarchy in an organization, this excuse is paralyzing for a team working on accomplishing meaningful goals.  

Instead of making this excuse, commit yourself to create a more compelling and value-oriented case for why a decision or action from someone else is needed quickly. Commit yourself to figure out why there is a delay and what you can do to help the situation instead of sitting back, powerless. 

Excuse 2: “I don’t have the money or budget.”

Finances and budgeting are a part of life and management. Instead of making this excuse, commit yourself to understand the budgeting process and what you or your team can do in the future to invest in the things you know are essential.  

While this might mean delaying an initiative you believe is important, it will put you in a more powerful position the next time you’re ready to invest in your team or adopt a new software tool.

Excuse 3: “I don’t have enough time.”

Time management is a part of every leader’s life. The collision course of people and things needing your time and attention is endless in a position of leadership. As Bhrett McCabe said on a recent episode of the Follow My Lead Podcast, “The job of a leader and a coach is a thankless job because you can never do enough.”

But there is one lesson I have learned in studying so many great leaders: “you make time for what’s important.”

“Great leaders make time and prioritize what’s important.”

Instead of making this excuse, commit yourself to a time management system that works for you and your team. Become a 5 AM club member, and you will be amazed at how much more time you have your day. 

Excuse 4: “It’s my team’s fault.”

If there is an excuse that gets my blood boiling, this is it. I have written about this before; “what a leader tolerates, they encourage.” Instead of making this excuse, look in the mirror and ask yourself, “what else could you do to help a team member perform better or make better decisions.”  

Everyone will make mistakes when they are doing challenging work, so embrace leadership’s responsibility and stop blaming your team. As Jack Welch famously said,

“When you were made a leader you weren’t given a crown, you were given the responsibility to bring out the best in others.”

Excuse 5: “I haven’t done this before.”

As quickly as technology and the markets are changing, there is a good chance you and your team are now responsible for doing work that it wasn’t doing six months to a year ago. Pat Gelsinger’s (New CEO of Intel and incredible leader) inspirational message to his new team at Intel highlighted the speed at which they had to innovate. He wrote, “passionately innovate with boldness and speed.”  

As great as the vision is, it won’t happen if employees at Intel use the excuse, “I haven’t done this before.” Instead of making this excuse, commit yourself to a growth mindset. Get comfortable with the idea that you can figure things out with research, hard work, and collaboration with others. 

Excuse 6: “It’s not only me, others are doing it as well.”

In this world with an ever-growing grey area, there still is right from wrong. I have written before about how to ensure you don’t become a bad leader. Understanding your core values and embracing your character is paramount in leadership.

Robert Caslen, a retired US Army Officer, current president at the University of South Carolina, and author of The Character Edge, told me in an interview on the Follow My Lead Podcast, “If you fail at character, you fail at leadership.”

Instead of making this excuse, take ownership of the mental and moral qualities distinctive to you and draw a line in the sand for what’s right and wrong. You might not win in the short-term because of your character, but you will in the long-term.

Excuse 7: “This market makes it too hard.”

There is no denying the impact of Covid on business markets. For some, it’s been a blessing they could never have expected, and for others, it’s been the curse no one would wish on their worst enemy.

Instead of making this excuse, accept the reality that COVID has placed on your team or business and look to transform and survive in the new market. The truth is, anyone or any team can reinvent themselves within a year if they put enough time, energy, and effort into it. With this mindset, you and your team can challenge yourself to try new things, innovate, and pivot to find new ways to succeed. 

Closing

Excuses are easy to make, which means you will have to work twice as hard to recognize when making them. There is a simple trick I learned from Brian Kight, “Eliminate BCD; eliminate blaming, complaining or defending” from your language.  

As Benjamin Franklin famously said, “Someone that is good at making excuses is seldom good for anything else.” Be the kind of leader who doesn’t make excuses and figures out a way to get things done.

Leverage Accountability in Leadership: Ready to take your accountability skills to the next level? Join us for the next Leverage Accountability in Leadership Workshop. Sign up and get “Proven Techniques to Leverage Accountability” immediately. Sign up today!

Coaching for Excellence: The development of your coaching skills will make a tremendous difference in helping you lead your best in 2021. Join the next Coaching for Excellence Workshop. Sign up and get “8 Questions to Leverage to Be a Better Coach” for free today! https://bit.ly/3goZLv2

Take the Free Leadership Style Quiz? Join over 55k leaders and discover your current leadership style for free.

About the Author: John Eades is the CEO of LearnLoft, a leadership development company helping executives and managers to lead their best. He was named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices in Management & Workplace. John is also the author of Building the Best: 8 Proven Leadership Principles to Elevate Others to Success. You can follow him on Instagram @johngeades.

How to Make Sure You Don’t Become a Bad Leader

Nobody starts out wanting to be a bad leader. Yet ego-driven, power-hungry, micromanaging, absent-minded managers and executives are prevalent in organizations. But don’t just take my word for it. In our research, more than 50% of respondents rated their leader as being below average.

What gives? 

Before I give you some ways to protect yourself from becoming a bad leader, it’s essential to provide the context of how I defined being a leader in Building the Best: Someone whose actions inspire, empower, and serve in order to elevate others.  

Why There Are So Many Bad Leaders

In most cases, bad leadership begins with either a lack of understanding about what good leadership is or assuming leadership is a job, instead of a mindset backed up by actions.

Leadership isn’t a job, it’s a mindset backed up by actions to elevate others.

Instead of debating all the reasons for the current lousy leader population, now is the time to become aware of ways to protect yourself from becoming a bad leader.

Know Your Core Values

I don’t care how old you are or what kind of role you have; there is one thing that is intimately important to ensure you are becoming the kind of leader you want to be, knowing your core values. 

Core values are simply the fundamental beliefs a person holds true. Once established with clarity, these guiding beliefs dictate behavior and help you decipher right from wrong. Here is why this is so important. Your current feelings and emotions win over your values if they aren’t clearly defined and intentionally set.  

When this happens, you will end up as a bad leader, justifying all those poor decisions. Don’t let this happen to you. Take the time to either define your core values or remind yourself of them.

If you want some help, download the Personal Core Values Blueprint here

Audit the Content Going to Your Mind

Tom Ziglar told me years ago, “What you feed your mind determines your appetite.” Which mimics his dad, Zig Ziglar’s famous quote:

“You are what you are and where you are, because of what’s gone into your mind. You can change what you are, and you can change where you are by changing what goes into your mind.” 

If you want to protect yourself from becoming a lousy leader, regularly audit the content going into your mind (You’re off to a great start reading this blog). Unfortunately, it might mean not binge-watching the next hot show on Netflix in favor of listening to a podcast or a leadership book. 

While this might seem trivial, small decisions like these add up to significant results over time. 

Increase Personal Accountability

Often, bad leaders don’t have people in their lives to hold them accountable to a certain standard. Typically it’s because they believe they’re self-disciplined enough not to need it or feel they are above it.

Accountability doesn’t happen by accident.  

Here is the trick, accountability doesn’t happen by accident. It takes inviting people into your life to hold you accountable. This can come in the context of a professional coach, friend, colleague, spouse, or a growth group. Regardless of who it is or how you do it, continually increase the accountability year after year. 

Don’t Underestimate the Temptation of Power

Most people want the promotion because of the greater sense of power that comes with the position. While there is nothing wrong with power on its own, it isn’t something to take lightly. As Plato said, “The measure of a man is what he does with power.” Power can bring out the worst in people – micromanagement, control issues, inflated egos, or disrespect for others. 

One of the best ways to circumvent power is to give it away. Once you get to a leadership role, empower others to make decisions they can make. 

Closing

These are just a few ways to protect yourself from becoming a bad leader. Now it’s your job to ensure they are in place, or you risk becoming a statistic like the majority of leaders in our study. 

How do you handle working with or for a bad leader? Tell me in the comments section.

Leverage Accountability in Leadership: Ready to take your accountability skills to the next level? Join us for the next Leverage Accountability in Leadership Workshop. Sign up and get “Proven Techniques to Leverage Accountability” immediately. Sign up today!

Coaching for Excellence: The development of your coaching skills will make a tremendous difference in helping you lead your best in 2021. Join me for the next Coaching for Excellence Workshop. Sign up and get “8 Questions to Leverage to Be a Better Coach” for free today! https://bit.ly/3goZLv2

Take the Free Leadership Style Quiz? Join over 55k leaders and discover your current leadership style for free.

About the Author: John Eades is the CEO of LearnLoft, a leadership development company helping executives and managers to lead their best. He was named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices in Management & Workplace. John is also the author of Building the Best: 8 Proven Leadership Principles to Elevate Others to Success. You can follow him on Instagram @johngeades.

7 Simple Lessons to Be a Better Leader Right Now

In search of great idea

One of the most impressive things about all great leaders is their relentless pursuit of wisdom. They do this through a learning cycle of knowledge, comprehension, and application that goes on their entire lives. 

What’s fascinating about leadership is many timeless principles remain the same, while at the same time, leaders need to change to remain successful in modern times. This is precisely why great leaders are grounded in principles but always keep an open mind and a learning mindset.

Great leaders are grounded in principles but always keep an open mind and a learning mindset.  

Whether you are the CEO of a company, managing a team, or just trying to lead your family better, these lessons will change your perspective on leadership or remind you what you already know. 

Lesson 1: Being a Leader Means It’s No Longer About You

Recent statistics show 40% of new managers fail within the first 24 months of taking their job. One of the primary reasons is managers believe and act like their promotion is about them. The truth is, the only day your title matters is the day you receive it. After that, all that matters is how you bring out the best in others.  

No alt text provided for this image

“When you were made a leader you weren’t given a crown, you were given the responsibility to bring out the best in others.” Jack Welch

Lesson 2: Leadership Isn’t about Power, but Excellence

Many people in leadership positions are ambitious. Which by itself isn’t a bad thing. However, ambition for power is bad, ambition for excellence is good. Your job is to channel your ambition into being an excellent leader focused on putting others’ needs ahead of your own and raising the bar on effort and performance. 

No alt text provided for this image

“Leadership is not about control but service. It’s not about power but empowerment.” – Dr. Myles Munroe

Lesson 3: A Leader’s Actions Matter More Than the Position

Most people with a title consider themselves a leader, but it couldn’t be further from the truth in reality. If it weren’t for the paycheck that hit their team’s account every two weeks, their team wouldn’t do or listen to a thing they said. The reason for this isn’t the title one has, but their actions daily.  

Your actions will always matter more than your words, especially when it comes to leadership. 

No alt text provided for this image

“Leadership is an action, not a position.” – Donald McGannon

Lesson 4: Leaders are Dealers of Hope and Courage

There are moments in time where the stakes are higher than usual for a team or organization. In military terms, this would be in a time of war, and business terms would be navigating a Global Pandemic. It’s times like this where uncertainty, fear, and worry consumes people.  

However, great leaders recognize this and know their job is to be a dealer of hope and courage to their people. To help them reject fear and step into courage. The reason is simple, leaders who don’t encourage will eventually be surrounded by a discouraged team.  

No alt text provided for this image

“The role of a leader is to define reality and give hope.” Napoleon

Lesson 5: Leaders Take the Blame and Give the Credit.

The late great Kobe Bryant said, “Leadership is responsibility.” Bryant was right, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy. It’s tempting to blame others when things go wrong, and easy to take credit for a team’s success when things go right. But just because it’s tempting and easy doesn’t mean it’s right. If you are in a leadership position, taking responsibility when things go wrong and giving credit when things go right is required. 

No alt text provided for this image

“When things go wrong, take all the blame. When things go right, give away all the credit.” – Dave Cancel

Lesson 6: Leaders Choose Positivity over Negativity

The current business world makes it hard to be optimistic. I don’t know if it’s the amount of negative information we receive, the speed at which judgments are cast, the sheer amount of people doing work they hate, or some combination of the three. If you are anything like me, you have struggled to maintain optimism during difficult times.

But the best leaders don’t give in to this kind of thinking. They don’t lower themselves or their mind to negative thinking. Instead, they train themselves and those around them to choose positivity over negativity.  

No alt text provided for this image

“Being positive won’t guarantee you’ll succeed. But being negative will guarantee you won’t.” – Jon Gordon

Lesson 7: Leaders Coach, They Don’t Judge

Conventional thinking has leaders believing their job is to be judge and jury over people and decision making. While there is no doubt part of a leader’s job is to make decisions, the correct thought process is for leaders to think of themselves as a coach, instead of a judge.  

There is enough judgment in this world, and having it passed onto us by a boss isn’t what we need. What’s needed is someone to help coach us and develop the skills required to be successful.  If you want to sharpen your coaching skills, register for the next Coaching for Excellence Workshop.

No alt text provided for this image

“A leader is a coach, not a judge.” – Dr. William Edwards Deming

Closing

Living out all seven of these lessons each day as a leader is difficult. But knowing you are in relentless pursuit of wisdom and understanding like so many great leaders who walked before you should be proof that you’re on the right path. 

Which lessons is your favorite, or what would you add? Let me know in the comments. 

Coaching for Excellence: The development of your coaching skills will make a tremendous difference in helping you lead your best in 2021. Join me for the next Coaching for Excellence Workshop. Sign up and get “8 Questions to Leverage to Be a Better Coach” for free today! https://bit.ly/3goZLv2

Take the Free Leadership Style Quiz? Join over 55k leaders and discover your current leadership style for free.

About the Author: John Eades is the CEO of LearnLoft, a leadership development company helping executives and managers to lead their best. He was named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices in Management & Workplace. John is also the author of Building the Best: 8 Proven Leadership Principles to Elevate Others to Success. You can follow him on Instagram @johngeades.

What The Best Leaders Know About Power

Do you remember the first time people looked to you to make a big decision or asked for approval before moving forward? That was power, and chances are, you liked it, wanted more of it, and even started looking for additional opportunities to exercise it.  

There is nothing inherently wrong with power. Some say it’s a fundamental tool used by great leaders. However, nothing will cause a leader’s demise more than falling in love with power. It can be a dangerous distraction from the most critical job of a leader today, elevating others.

Take Chris, a Division VP at an established manufacturing company, for example. When he was first promoted to Vice President, he didn’t care who had the power or how much he possessed. Instead, he was so excited about the opportunity to impact the lives of 100 people positively. 

For the first five years in the job, his team’s performance improved so much that Chris was labeled “the next big thing” in the company. When discussions began on the management team about a new President, Chris’ wheels began to turn. Not only did he want the job, he thought the other VP’s were borderline incompetent. 

Chris did what most people in this position do. He started jockeying for power and authority. He communicated his vision for the company and why he was the best person for the job to anyone who would listen. He even went as far as to throw others under the bus to make himself look better.  

Not only did it take a toll on his credibility with employees, but his own team’s performance began to suffer. When Chris finally noticed the slip, he didn’t look in the mirror at himself; he exercised his authority and demanded better and faster work.  

The result was a team that turned against him and a promotion that slipped through his fingers. Eventually, Chris was politely asked to leave the company by the newly promoted president. 

There is nothing wrong with the desire or ambition to get a promotion, whether it’s a frontline manager or president, but pursuing a title just for power is a recipe for disaster. 

If you want to ensure what happened to Chris doesn’t happen to you, let’s get clear on what you can do to avoid being blinded by power. 

Understand What Power Is and Isn’t

There are many definitions or perspectives about power, but the definition I am using today is the possession of control, authority, or influence over others. It is leveraged by leaders to persuade people to action or to do as they ask. Many managers, supervisors, and executives have control or authority because of their position. However, influence can be gained by anyone because it’s primarily earned.  

Influence over others has its greatest impact when it’s earned, not given.  

In countless examples from our research, the best leaders earn their influence over others by focusing on an inner strength that doesn’t depend on outward things. This inner strength is then used to inspire others to make their own decisions in the team’s best interest. While they will occasionally exercise their control or authority because of their position, it’s not a trump card they prefer to pull. 

Power Can Corrupt

Abraham Lincon said it best, “If you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” In organizational leadership, certain hierarchical positions come with control over resources. This can cause leaders to act on their selfish human nature versus what’s in their organization or team’s best interest. If one doesn’t have humility and high character, power will overtake them.  

It’s common in my coaching conversations to hear about leaders feeling threatened by a high performer or sense they are threatening another leader above them because of their performance. Research suggests that the desire for a leader to maintain their position atop the hierarchy can be so strong that many are willing to engage in questionable and unethical behaviors to protect it. 

Typical behavior includes; lying, taking credit where it doesn’t belong, sabotaging someone else, or withholding information or resources to make work harder. As evil as these sound, they happen every day in politics, companies, and even families, and no one is immune to the temptation of making them.

Power (Like Money) Does Matter

Don’t think for a second this is a bash session about power. Just like money, power absolutely matters. Take money, for example. Money by itself isn’t evil; it makes possible the best what earth affords, and it’s a vehicle to opportunity.  

Power is similar; your ability to get things accomplished, create a better future than exists today, and impact others relies heavily on having power. To act as if it’s not essential or that only bad leaders care about it would be stinking thinking.  

What you do with power matters, and it makes or breaks you as a leader.

Here are the power questions I want you to ask yourself:

  • Why are my true intentions for wanting more power?
  • Who could benefit from the power I gain outside of myself?
  • Who has the power in my organization today?
  • Whom do I need to get to know better to acquire it?
  • How would you use power if you had it?

Closing

The best part of leadership is that it’s a journey and not a destination. You will be happy to know Chris learned this lesson about power the hard way. Through a lot of hard work, he makes sure he doesn’t fall in love with power and keeps his attention on elevating others, now that he is the CEO.

Now is the Time to Lead Your Best. Don’t wait on your company to provide another leadership development program, Join the Ultimate Leadership Academy. Make this your best leadership year ever with proven courses and exclusive weekly leadership lessons.

Take the Free Leadership Style Quiz? Join over 50k leaders and discover your current leadership style for free.

About the Author: John Eades is the CEO of LearnLoft, a leadership development company helping executives and managers to lead their best. He was named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices in Management & Workplace. John is also the author of Building the Best: 8 Proven Leadership Principles to Elevate Others to Success. You can follow him on Instagram @johngeades.

How to Leverage Healthy Conflict as a Leader to Improve Performance


Power is a drug.

Once you get a taste of it, it’s hard to stop the ambition to get more of it. 

Give a bad leader the ability to make every decision, micromanage others, and enforce their will on those they lead he will throw ever being a great leader right out of the window.  

The tug of war match between people for power is also what creates conflict, but not necessarily the conflict that’s helpful. Instead of assuming all conflict is the same, it’s important to understand there are different types of conflict.

5 Most Common Types of Conflict in the Workplace

Through our research studying teams and leaders, we identified the 5 most common types of conflict in the workplace between bosses and their direct reports:

  1. Interdependent conflict – This conflict between leader and teams depends on the output, input, or cooperation between the parties. This conflict usually comes down to two key elements quality or speed.  A great example of this would be two people on an assembly line. If the first person is slow or doesn’t complete the task correctly it will create conflict with the rest of the team affected by it.
  2. Opinion Conflict –  This conflict emerges when the manager and team members have a different opinion on a particular project, decision, or internal procedure. This conflict usually happens while a decision is being made without a clear correct answer. A good example of this would be conflict on a marketing team about what to name a blog title before publishing it. While one answer could prove to be more successful than the other in the future (think A/B testing), more often than not, one decision is made and the other isn’t tested further. 
  3. Expectation Conflict –  This conflict is created because of the said or unsaid expectations that a person is held responsible to.  Most of the conflict between managers and direct reports comes from two key places; the lack of communication between them or disagreement around the expectations that have been communicated.  A good example of this is a sales person’s arbitrary quota getting set at the beginning of the year. (It gets raised 20% for no reason other than the calendar turns). It’s important to note that the expectation conflict could come from the opposite direction, an employee might have expectations of their bosses and because of a lack of communication, it causes conflict.
  4. Core Conflict –  This conflict tends to be political, religious, gender, ethnic, even environmental related.  These can be the most difficult because most people can’t find common ground in their core differences or don’t want to altogether. 
  5. Personality Conflict – This conflict often arises because people are wired differently.  These are things like a Myers-Briggs Type, Enneagram score, different strengths and weaknesses in Gallup’s Strength’s Finder, or even different Productivity Styles can all be sources of conflict.  

Most leaders go out of their way to ensure there is no conflict.  This isn’t the best strategy. Ignoring or not having any conflict on your team will cost you. I want you to think of conflict as a positive and invite it into your team by remembering this:

Healthy conflict creates courage and connection

Courage and Connection

Courage is being frightened of something and deciding to do it anyways. Teams need courage just like you do as a leader.  A team needs the courage to go into the unknown or achieve things together that they have never achieved before. But through healthy conflict with one another, it will build courage in people.  It will provide an internal belief that the team has prepared itself. Through that healthy conflict, deeper connections from person to person will emerge.  When deeper connection happens that’s when teams become successful.  

A great example of this is the book Building the Best that just came out.  Our team had never published a book before with a major publisher. We didn’t know if our writing was good enough, the ideas were good enough, or collectively we were good enough.  When the initial rejection emails came back from publishers it was disheartening, but no one gave up.  

Instead, we discussed the reasons the rejection emails were coming back and engaged in healthy conflict about modifying the things we could control. These were things such as the name of the book, names of leadership styles, competencies from the research and other publishers we should approach.  when I tell you not everyone had the same opinion on these subjects, that might be an understatement. But through the healthy conflict we engaged in, our courage grew. We felt more confident in the content, titles, and branding. A belief began to emerge that this book deserved to be published. Though this healthy conflict between us connections between team members grew deeper.

Of the 5 common types of conflict between bosses and direct reports in the workplace, Interdependent Conflict, Opinion Conflict, Expectation Conflict, Core Conflict, and Personality Conflict the one I want to share some ways to improve is opinion conflict because it exists in every team.

The #1 goal of opinion conflict is to get to the best possible decision for the team. 

If you lead a team, here are the factors I want you to consider when engaging in healthy opinion conflict:

  1. Size of the decision – How big or small is the decision that needs to be made? Does it have a big impact or little impact and how much risk involved in the decision?
  2. Invite conflict to the team – Invite opinion conflict by articulating by communicating the desire to get to the best possible answer on a solution to a problem. It important to note explosive conflict will not be tolerated.
  3. Consider the expert opinion – Consider what person on the team is the upmost expert but don’t assume they always have the right ideas because good ideas can come from anyone.
  4. Listen to every opinion – Truly listen to the opinion of everyone on the team who is offering them. Make sure you are open to the opinions of others and the decision isn’t already made.  Andy Stanley “If people don’t listen they will eventually be surrounded by people with nothing to say.”
  5. Know feelings will be involved– Anytime you are having conflict about opinions, feelings will get in involved. Use your emotional intelligence and be considerate of everyone’s feelings. Stick to facts as much as possible.
  6. Create systems or tools – Use systems or tools to help use the conflict to get to the best decision possible. Examples of this would be a mediator, charts, lists, and agreed-upon principles.

Elevate the Way You Lead: Building the Best: 8 Proven Leadership Principles to Elevate Others to Success is published by McGraw-Hill. It was named the #1 Best New Management Books to Read by Book Authority. Learn the stories, principles, and tools to help elevate the way you lead others.

About the Author: John Eades is the CEO of LearnLoft, a leadership development company that exists to turn managers into leaders and create healthier places to work. He is currently booking events and speaking engagements for 2020. John was named one of LinkedIn’s 2017 Top Voices in Management & Workplace and was awarded the 2017 Readership Award by Training Industry.com. John is also the host of the “Follow My Lead” Podcast, a show that transfers stories and best practices from today’s leaders to the leaders of tomorrow. You follow him on Instagram @johngeades.